Leaflets of Operation Desert Shield
and Desert Storm
(Continued)

KUWAITI CONSOLIDATION LEAFLETS

With The defeat of the Iraqi forces, the government of Kuwait had to gather its resources and reestablish control. The following leaflets are consolidation leaflets, meant to support the population, motivate and instruct them. A consolidation task force from the 4th PSYOP Group stayed in Kuwait for a full month after the cessation of hostilities to help the country get back on its feet. Psychological Operations during Desert Shield/Storm says:

Starting in late February 1991… PSYOP elements formed a PSYOP Task Force (POTF) consisting of a propaganda development cell, print company, and media company from the PSYOP Dissemination Battalion; and loudspeaker assets from the 5th Special Forces group and the Marine Corp Central PSYOP Support Element.

k01back.jpg (18032 bytes)

k01.jpg (17276 bytes)

K01

F: All Arabic text. B&W.
"Thanks for not running, and to all the Coalition forces, and to all the heroes for resisting."

B: "The Kuwaiti United Leadership: Brother natives, sister natives, brother citizens, sister citizens. Please listen and help the Multi-national forces at the checkpoints. Please take even the smallest information to the checkpoint or armed station nearest you. Thank you for all your help, and congratulations upon Kuwait. 8 lines of text.

K01 and K02 were a two-leaflet set with product numbers 4-QA and 4-QB. A total of 20,000 leaflets were printed, so we might assume that 10,000 of K01 were produced.

k02.jpg (12259 bytes)

k02back.jpg (22405 bytes)

K02

F: All Arabic text. B&W.
"Thanks for not running, and to all the Coalition forces, and to all the heroes for resisting."

B: "The Kuwaiti United Leadership: Brother natives, sister natives, brother citizens, sister citizens. There is a curfew from 10 p.m. until 4 a.m. It is very important to bring back the security of this beautiful land. Congratulations upon Kuwait." 8 lines of text.

K01 and K02 were a two-leaflet set with product numbers 4-QA AND 4-QB. A total of 20,000 leaflets were printed, so we might assume that 10,000 of K02 were produced.

k03back.jpg (17020 bytes)

k03.jpg (17728 bytes)

K03

F: Radio station at left, Kuwait seal at right. B&W.
"Listen to Radio Kuwait on FM frequencies 92.5, 97.5, 87.9, and 98.8 MHZ."

B: "Listen to Radio Kuwait on AM frequencies 1341 KHZ, 1134 KHZ, and 540 KHZ."

K03 and K04 were a two-leaflet set. A total of 50,000 leaflets were printed, so we might assume that 25,000 of K03 were produced. The Voice of the Gulf broadcast from Riyadh with transmitters at Quaysumah and Abu Ali. Programs consisted of news, music, information, and PSYOP messages. Broadcasts on AM and FM frequencies from 0600 to 2300 daily.

k04back.jpg (15852 bytes)

k04back.jpg (15852 bytes)

K04

F: Radio station at left, Kuwait seal at right. B&W.
"Listen to Radio Kuwait on FM frequencies 92.5, 97.5, 87.9, and 98.8 MHZ."

B: Identical to front.

K03 and K04 were a two-leaflet. A total of 50,000 leaflets were printed, so we might assume that 25,000 of K04 were produced.

k05.jpg (12777 bytes)   k05back.jpg (11048 bytes)

K05

F: Faint Kuwait flag background. B&W.
"Warning. Please do not touch equipment capable of exploding. Please inform your police station."

B: Kuwaiti flag background. B&W.
"Warning. We warn you not to touch or move any suspicious objects such as handbags, radios, boxes, or appealing foreign equipment, since they are capable of exploding. Please inform the local police station in your area."

During the consolidation period there are always a number of leaflets and posters warning against mines, booby-traps, and other explosives. Children are especially at risk since they will pick up cluster bomb units, hand grenades and other interesting objects. 250,000 of these leaflets were printed to warn the population. They are not very eye-catching and something more spectacular was required. The internal name for this leaflet is “Save Lives.”

  k06back.jpg (13758 bytes) k06back.jpg (13758 bytes)

K06

F: Skull and crossed bones over 3 water-tower minarets. B&W/Red.
"Warning. Please do not touch explosive equipment. Please inform the authorities or the Allied forces immediately."

B: Same as front. 3 lines of text.

This second explosive warning leaflet is much more effective. It is more pictorial with the red explosion at top and the skull and crossed bones denoting death. 250,000 of these leaflets were printed to warn the population. The code name is also more impressive, “Boom I.”

 

k07back.jpg (14014 bytes)  k07back.jpg (14014 bytes)

K07

F: Skull and crossed bones over 3 water-tower minarets. B&W/Red.
"Warning. Don't touch anything suspicious that encourages your curiosity such as radios, cans, hand bags, and mechanical machines. They may explode when touched. Report all strange objects to the authorities or Coalition Forces immediately."

B: Same as front. 6 lines of text.

A second explosive warning leaflet similar to K07 but with more instructional text. 250,000 of these leaflets were printed to warn the population. Naturally, the code name for this leaflet is “Boom II.”

k08back.jpg (18469 bytes)  k08.jpg (15515 bytes)

K08

F: Various explosives. Black and red. 150x210mm. Bond paper.
English: "Stop. These items kill!! Do not touch. Contact the police or the military."

B: Identical to front but with Arabic text.

One of the most popular mine warning handouts of a convenient size that could also be used as a poster. The bright red stop sign and text was meant to catch the eye of the reader. These were very common after the war and I have seen them on regular bond paper, cardboard, and thin paper that allows the text on the back to show through.

 

K09

F: Large poster. B&W. Numerous exploding devices pictured.
In Arabic and English: "The danger of explosives. No matter the size – no Matter the shape – your life they will take – do not touch or move – report suspicious items immediately to the military or civil authorities."

B: Blank.

This is an extremely large 27.5 x 19.5-inch poster that is difficult to show due to its size. We have no information on production or dissemination.

K10Poster.jpg (35373 bytes)

K10

F: Large poster. Color. Crossed-over hand reaching for grenade.
Arabic text: "Danger!!! Don't try to touch or move any strange object because it could explode or blow up at any time. Try to report to the authorities or the military when you find any strange object."

B: Blank.

A more standard sized poster at about 13.5 x 9.5-inches. The first of three. Each has a large "prohibited" sign, a simple illustration and a short message. 5,000 of these posters were printed. This one specifically targets grenades, but the warning is against picking up any strange object.

K11.jpg (15909 bytes)

K11

F: Large poster. Color. Crossed-over stylized divers.
Arabic and English: "Danger. Do not enter beach area – unexploded ordinance."

B: Blank.

An interesting poster that warns about swimming. The danger is not sharks; it is unexploded mines and explosive ordnance. We have no information on production or dissemination.

K12.jpg (25336 bytes)

K12

F: Large poster. Color. Crossed over circle symbol for "prohibited."
In Arabic "Danger! Do not enter. Unexploded ordinance."

B: Blank.

This is just a general prohibition about entering. It could be used anyplace that the authorities considered dangerous; streets, buildings or rooms. We have no information on production or dissemination.

K13.jpg (38808 bytes)

K13

F: Arab hands weapon to uniformed soldier. B&W. 165x170mm.
Sign on building "Police precinct." Sign on door "Place to hand in weapons."

B: Blank.

Consolidation leaflet K13 is a handbill about 6 1/2 inches square. The drawing is crude and in B&W and at first glance it would seem to be a product produced outside of the Coalition, perhaps by a local printer. However, this is not the case. 4th Group documents show that this leaflet was product number 4-M with the title "Turn in Weapons." It was an attempt to get civilians who had been part of the Kuwaiti resistance to turn in their weapons at the local police station. 20,000 of the handbills were printed. There is no data on their dissemination.

TFFreedom01.jpg (36529 bytes)

K14

F: Cardboard ID card for dash. Color. 3.5 x 11.9." Seven Coalition flags.
"Task Force Freedom."

B: Blank.

During Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Task Force Freedom was designed to work with representatives of the Kuwaiti government in exile to formulate a plan for the restoration and reconstruction of Kuwait. Two hours after the official end of offensive operations, the advanced party was on the ground at the Kuwait International Airport. That same day the forward command post was activated in the Kuwaiti Ministry of Education Supply Compound in Subhan, east of the airport. That became Camp Freedom. At its peak, Task Force Freedom reached strength of over 3,650 personnel and worked closely with the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait. Product K14 is a foot-long cardboard placard depicting the flags of the major military forces in Kuwait. It was placed on the dashboard of a Coalition vehicle to identify it. 10,000 of these cards were printed. I also have a paper version of this item, not listed in Johnson’s book.

K15.jpg (8328 bytes)

K15

F: Plastic bumper sticker. B&W. Three Kuwaiti towers and Arabic text.
"Long Live Kuwait."

This was a very early item printed before the shooting war started. The product number is 1-B, which indicates it was made about the same time as the very first “Why we are here.” card. Johnson placed it in this section because of the message.

V16.jpg (16686 bytes)

K16

F: Cardboard U.S. flag (for Camp Freedom). Color. 3 x 6."

B: Blank.

I have never seen this item in person and have no idea how many were printed or how they were used. One assumes they were a way for the troops in the Camp Freedom complex to express their patriotism. In one of the short propaganda films produced at Ft. Bragg these flag leaflets (or the following leaflet V16) are seen being printed, cut into individual stacks and loaded into a leaflet box. The implication is that they were to be dropped. The question is; who would they be dropped on?

V16.jpg (16686 bytes)

V16

F: Paper U.S. flag (for Camp Freedom). Color. 3 x 6."

B: Blank.

I have never seen this item in person and have no idea how many were printed or how they were used. One assumes they were a way for the troops in the Camp Freedom complex to express their patriotism.

Next Page